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Smooth exits

Smooth exits

We all know how crucial onboarding is. When an employee walks into your organization for the first time, they need to feel a sense of excitement and belonging. Scheduling out their orientation for them, giving them a tour, and even offering some goodies that display your brand gives you the ability to start them off on the right foot on day one.

With that said, when an individual exits your company, it is just as crucial that you handle their exit in a smooth way. This is true for a few reasons-

Your Employees

Whether someone is let go or moves onto another opportunity on their own, it can affect the rest of your team just the same. In smaller organizations, having one person exit not only leaves a hole in the workload temporarily, but could also have a huge effect on the atmosphere of the office.

This atmosphere change can occur for two reasons. First, when you work on a small team, you become extremely close to your co-workers. You all work hard to support each other to better the business. So when someone leaves, it can sometimes be difficult to get used to their absence in day-to-day activities.

Another way the energy in your office can change is if employees are not educated as to why their coworker is no longer with the company. This doesn't mean you have to get into the nitty gritty of whatever led to their departure. However, by giving employees a formal announcement about the change, you can not only control the message (and avoid rumors), but also have the opportunity to give them a peace of mind about the security of their own positions.

Your Brand

When an employee leaves, they are going to leave with an opinion on how their exit went. Obviously, if you're letting someone go, it is hard to turn that into a positive. Make sure you are careful to give the employee enough information about why they are being let go – in order to mitigate and possibly help them gain control of their emotions. In a formal exit interview, ask them questions about their experience with your organization. This will give them the opportunity to get any of their grievances out in a safe environment. If they don't have this opportunity to "vent", so to speak, they may get online and start leaving employment reviews that could affect your brand.

Negative feedback goes a lot farther than positive. People these days are much more likely to voluntarily complain about a bad experience then they are to give positive reviews. By handling their exit respectfully, you are protecting yourself against negative brand exposure that may inhibit you from attracting the types of candidates you want.

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You're already brave

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